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Can a bear and a cat be friends?

Thursday, 20 August 2009 21:55

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I think that cats really get along with ANYONE or ANYTHING.  I think that people (and or animals) can make a choice to dislike cats.  I also think that some cats' personalities clash with other personalities (which is to be expected).  So this story really wasn't surprising to me - BUT IT'S STILL GREAT!  Especially because we call AJAX "Little Bear" (We also call him Needle Feet as well).  He really reminds us of a bear sometimes.  
 
Muschi the cat and Maeuschen the bear live at the Berlin Zoo. They met 8 years ago and they've been best pals ever since.  The friends share everything including an enclosure and food at Berlin Zoo
 

 

 

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Can you scruff a Mountain Lion?

Saturday, 01 August 2009 11:23

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Would You Scruff a Mountain Lion?

Vote!

Today, I had to scruff Ajax because he was acting too tough.  I was sitting on a chair that he likes while speaking to my Mother on the phone.  He continued to try to box and bite me, so I got really fed up and decided to go back to the ways when he was super little.  If you aren't sure what scruffing is, read here: 


How to Scruff a Cat - Tool for Discouraging Undesirable Behavior ...

Anyway, so Ajax, (who is close to ten pounds at this point) really didn't appreciate being scruffed, but it worked.  I put him in the bedroom to cool off.  10 minutes later he sauntered out and began to 'obviously ignore' me.

If I were to encounter a rabid feral cat I would scruff it.  I really think that I would.  If you had asked me that 1 year ago, I would have not had the same response, but now that I have experience with Ajax - I think I would have the wherewithal.  Ofcourse, I understand that if I got attacked by a feral cat, that I would have serious injuries, but I would still fight to subdue the cat.  So I started thinking, can you scruff a Mountain Lion?

It appears so!  According to Wilderness Utah:  

" When it comes to mountain lion encounters, many fatalities have been averted simply because the victim fought. One story even reports a grandmother pulling a mountain lion off her grandson by the scruff of its neck!"

 

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How old is your kitty?

Tuesday, 06 January 2009 0:28

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The cat's age in relation to a human's Cat's age: Human's age:

6 months- 10 years

8 months- 13 years

1 year- 15 years

2 years- 24 years

4 years.- 32 years

6 years- 40 years

8 years- 48 years

10 years- 56 years

12 years- 64 years

14 years- 72 years

16 years- 80 years

18 years- 88 years

20 years- 96 years

21 years- 100 years

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How Old Is Your Cat?

Tuesday, 23 December 2008 23:14

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An average life span might be 12 to 14 years. Some cats are reaching 20 or more.
 
A cat's longevity depends on feeding, genetics, environment, veterinary care and some other factors. It is also important whether or not the cat lives indoors or is allowed outdoors (outdoor cats live an averge of eight years).
 
The general consensus is that at about age seven the cat can be considered as "middle-aged", and at age 10 and beyond - old.
The cat's age in relation to a human's Cat's age: Human's age:
 
6 months- 10 years
8 months- 13 years
1 year- 15 years
2 years- 24 years
4 years.- 32 years
6 years- 40 years
8 years- 48 years
10 years- 56 years
12 years- 64 years
14 years- 72 years
16 years- 80 years
18 years- 88 years
20 years- 96 years
21 years- 100 years
 

 

Image Source: Ilooshka

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Cool Cat Facts...

Tuesday, 23 December 2008 23:02

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People who are allergic to cats are actually allergic to cat saliva or to cat dander. If the resident cat is bathed regularly the allergic people tolerate it better. Studies now show that the allergen in cats is related to their scent glands. Cats have scent glands on their faces and at the base of their tails. Entire male cats generate the most scent. If this secretion from the scent glands is the allergen, allergic people should tolerate spayed female cats the best.
 
Cats are pure carnivores. They need a high level of protein in their diets - and can't digest well a diet of grains, fruits or vegetables. If you were to design a creature to live from hunting mammals you couldn't do better than the design of the cat. Cats have powerful jaws, sharp teeth, and claws that draw back into their paws when not in use. Cats hear extremely well. Their eyes are adapted for vision in dim light for hunting just before dawn and just after dusk, the prime hunting periods.
 
Of all families of predators the cat family is the one that varies most in size. Biggest of all is the tiger which may weigh several hundred kilos. The smallest of the small cats is the black-footed cat in South Africa which weighs only just over one kilo. There are many similarities between the two multi-specied genera. Both have retractable claws, all are stealth hunters, i.e. they approach their prey stealthily, and all except the cheetah are skilful climbers. All except the lion live alone.

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On second thought.... Do you think this video is gross? Please answer my poll, I need to know how other's feel about this....

Monday, 22 December 2008 23:07

Did this video gross you out?

Vote!

I was completely on board with this whole potty training idea and planned to use this video to convince my husband that this was an awesome idea... until the last second of this video.  It was pretty funny...but also a little gross when I consider that my cat AJAX, likes to use my pillow as a door mat.  What do you think?

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Speaking of "cool cat tricks"... Cat's that are trained to use the Human Toilet.

Monday, 22 December 2008 22:57

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I wonder how many treats, messy kitty litter crumbs, patience and all that good stuff ... is needed to potty train a cat? A beautiful cat named Misha teaches us about what it takes! Read More...

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Message to new pet owners. If you welcome an animal into your home, that animal is now a member of the family....

Monday, 22 December 2008 3:24

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I felt the need to say that because I just read an awful story about abuse to a poor 4 month old kitten who was brutaly beaten for licking milk from a cereal bowl, by a 34 year old father. (The kittten has since been adopted by a loving family) We all know that little kitty's can be quite naughty... it's actually rather endearing dealing with a little one that acts bratty from time to time. People have to realize that pets are like children, why would you treat a child like that? Kitten's don't know better, but guess what!?!... with patience and love, they learn. I can't help but feel sorry for someone who could ever hurt a small, sweet little animal. Actually, it doesn't even matter if the animal is sweet or not, it's just not cool to be a bully. Bully's are weak, sick and sad. If you want to read about this awful guy that is getting tried in criminal court for doing an unthinkable act, read on...... Read More...

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Cats love Maui…. Can you blame them?

Tuesday, 02 December 2008 21:09

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Sarah Ruppenthal writes a compelling article comparing the resident felines to Bambi.

 

Did you know:

  • According to 9th Life Hawai‘i, Maui’s nonprofit, no-kill homeless cat rescue and sanctuary, the number of stray cats has escalated to nearly 500,000.

 

  • Just one female cat and her offspring are likely to produce 420,000 cats in seven years. So, do the math—and try to imagine if the same number of dogs (or deer) roamed the streets unsupervised.

 

 

Sarah provides information on how the problem can be solved.  Read her article on Maui Weekly or see below:

 

A Purrrfect World  Sarah Ruppenthal · Editorial Assistant

Help end Maui’s feline overpopulation problem.

 

I grew up on a small island just a ferry ride away from Seattle, Wash., where the rocky shorelines were fringed by towering evergreens and the herds of wild deer were as plentiful as the raindrops falling from the Pacific Northwest sky.

 

It seemed as if the deer would multiply by the hour; and while these graceful, wide-eyed creatures were harmless, their lives often ended as tragically as the infamous scene from Walt Disney’s Bambi. Overpopulated and underfed, hundreds of deer would succumb to disease, starvation, or a fateful encounter with a passing vehicle.

 

And for many of my neighbors, the deer were regarded as a nuisance, trampling flower beds, ravaging vegetable gardens and leaving their waste on meticulously landscaped front lawns.

 

Does any of this sound familiar? If so, perhaps you have experienced the startling, late-night chorus of (what seems like) dozens of amorous cats outside of your bedroom window, or spotted the tiny, lifeless form of a kitten alongside the highway.

 

It’s no secret that Maui has a feline overpopulation. According to 9th Life Hawai‘i, Maui’s nonprofit, no-kill homeless cat rescue and sanctuary, the number of stray cats has escalated to nearly 500,000.

 

Just one female cat and her offspring are likely to produce 420,000 cats in seven years. So, do the math—and try to imagine if the same number of dogs (or deer) roamed the streets unsupervised.

 

Okay, so how can we “fix” this problem? According to the Feline Foundation of Maui (www.mauicats.com), “Cat overpopulation will be a problem as long as the animals are reproducing.” So, if you are a pet owner, take a few moments to consider the long-term benefits of surgical sterilization.

 

In an effort to end the cycle of breeding while steering clear of euthanasia, organizations such as the Feline Foundation of Maui, Maui Humane Society and 9th Life Hawai‘i strongly urge pet owners to act responsibly and compassionately by spaying or neutering their cats (and dogs, too).

 

The Feline Foundation of Maui uses the TNR (trap, neuter and release) method to humanely stabilize feral populations, while 9th Life Hawai‘i offers pet owners free or very low-cost spay and neuter clinics with participating veterinarians. In addition, 9th Life Hawai‘i also serves as a rescue shelter and adoption agency. Take advantage of these available services, do your part and be responsible—that will give us all something to purr about.

 

For more information, visit the 9th Life Hawai‘i Website at www.9thLifeHawaii.org or the Maui Humane Society Website at  www.mauihumane.org.

 

 

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Cat Food Taste Test: Fancy Feast vs. Friskies

Friday, 28 November 2008 22:45

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Which cat food is better? Friskies or Fancy Feast?

Vote!

Which is better?

 

In a taste test conducted by Joni Lambert, the least expensive brand Friskies won.  See here:  Video on Cat food taste test. But, which one is healthier?  

 

May cat AJAX, LOVES Fancy Feast (anything with gravy), but he also east Friskies as well.They are both made by Purina.  Shockingly, when I researched online the results on Yahoo Answers is that they are both pretty bad: 

 

Both of them are pretty lousy foods. 

Look at the labels--
A cat needs a protein content of 11% or higher in canned foods, 35% or higher in dry foods.

The ingredients should list at least two meat sources in the first four ingredients, they should NOT be by-products. And there should be no corn listed in the first 5 ingredients (cats can't digest corn, it's a filler they get no benefit from). The ingredients always list the things with the most volume in the food from largest to smallest, so the first five or six things are very important. 


Evo canned is very good, so is Wellness (canned), Chicken Soup for the Cat Lovers Soul (canned), some of the NutroMax, etc. Look at the labels--the protein and the meat sources, and you'll make good choices.

 

There was also a positive response:

 

"Actually, it's the same meat and fish by-products. Fancy Feast is more expensive, but it smells and looks better.  My cats like both Friskies and Fancy Feast."

 

But this answer didn't really touch on the health aspect...  What do you think?

 

SOURCE

 

 

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